asapscience:

The descent into Alzheimer’s disease. A doctor chronicles the signatures of his patient as the disease took hold of her. Our love goes out to anyone who’s dealt with this awful disease in some way. 
via Reddit

asapscience:

The descent into Alzheimer’s disease. 

A doctor chronicles the signatures of his patient as the disease took hold of her. Our love goes out to anyone who’s dealt with this awful disease in some way. 

via Reddit

(via neurosciencestuff)

todayinhistory:

September 1st 1983: Korean Air Lines Flight 007 shot down

On this day in 1983 the Korean Air Lines Flight 007 from New York City to Seoul was shot down by a Soviet jet fighter over the Sea of Japan. All 269 passengers and crew aboard the flight were killed, leaving no survivors; the majority of the victims were South Koreans. Flight 007 was off course and strayed into Soviet airspace, which was on high alert due to the presence of a US reconnaissance plane that resembled a Boeing 747 aircraft. Soviet pilot Major Gennadi Osipovich was responsible for the attack, and despite privately suspecting it might be a civilian jet, fired a heat-seeking missile at the plane which caused it to crash into the ocean. Occurring in the middle of the Cold War, the incident increased tensions between the world’s two leading superpowers - the United States and the Soviet Union. In what US President Ronald Reagan called a “massacre”, among the 269 victims was a US Congressman from Georgia. This incident has been much discussed recently due to the shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine on July 17th 2014.

"‘Landscapes’ are the symbolic environments created by human acts of conferring meaning to nature and the environment, of giving the environment definition and form from a particular angle of vision and through a special filter of values and beliefs. Every landscape is a symbolic environment. These landscapes reflect our self definitions that are grounded in culture."
-

Landscapes: The Social Construction of Nature and the Environment’.- T.Greider & L. Garkovich 

in ‘Rural Sociology. vol 59, no.1 (1994)’

(via socio-logic)

(Source: sociology-of-space, via socio-logic)

todayinhistory:

August 29th 1842: Treaty of Nanking signed

On this day in 1842, the Treaty of Nanking was signed by the United Kingdom and China. The treaty ended the First Opium War which began in 1839 and resulted in the defeat of Qing China by the British. The war was fought over the smuggling of European opium into China, and was sparked when Chinese officials confiscated around 20,000 chests of the drug from British traders. With China defeated, the two sides met aboard the HMS Cornwallis moored at Nanking and their representatives signed the treaty. The agreement, considered unequal by the Chinese as they received no concessions, mostly concerned trade and gave the British more control over Chinese trade. It also provided for the Qing government to pay reparations for the confiscated opium and the cost of the war. Very importantly, the treaty also saw the Chinese cede the territory of Hong Kong to the British, which only returned to Chinese rule in 1997.

The Quirks of Smallness

parislemon:

Joe Pinsker on a unique strategy employed by Herb Hyman, the owner of Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf:

He determined his shops’ proximity to Starbucks to be such a boon that he began opening locations close to established Starbucks—a sly reversal of the national chain’s strategy. “We bought a Chinese restaurant right next to one of their stores and converted it, and by God, it was doing $1 million a year right away,” Hyman is quoted as saying in Starbucked.

Rather than run and hide from the big guy, or be terrified of his arrival into town, Coffee Bean started doing the opposite. And they thrived — undoubtedly because it helps to be next to Goliath when you’re trying to get people to pull for David.

(Also interesting data on small boards versus big boards — which makes total sense.)

expectlabs:

"First we build the tools, then they build us." — Marshall McLuhan
We’re rolling out a collection of quotes that we turn to for inspiration, starting with the one above by Marshall McLuhan. The quote is taken from McLuhan’s seminal piece on media theory, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, written in 1964.
Have a favorite quote you think we should include on the blog? Leave a note in the comments!

expectlabs:

"First we build the tools, then they build us." — Marshall McLuhan

We’re rolling out a collection of quotes that we turn to for inspiration, starting with the one above by Marshall McLuhan. The quote is taken from McLuhan’s seminal piece on media theory, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, written in 1964.

Have a favorite quote you think we should include on the blog? Leave a note in the comments!

(via linguisten)

The Stand-Along App

Seeing the same with Runkeeper/Breeze

parislemon:

The most interesting thing about Instagram’s new app, Hyperlapse, isn’t that it’s a stand-alone app, it’s that it’s only a lens.

A lot has been made in recent months of companies “unbundling” their apps to create simpler, more streamlined experiences for users. The jury is still very much out…

"Poverty is not simply having no money — it is isolation, vulnerability, humiliation and mistrust. It is not being able to differentiate between employers and exploiters and abusers. It is contempt for the simplistic illusion of meritocracy — the idea that what we get is what we work for. It is knowing that your mother, with her arthritic joints and her maddening insomnia and her post-traumatic stress disordered heart, goes to work until two in the morning waiting tables for less than minimum wage, or pushes a janitor’s cart and cleans the shit-filled toilets of polished professionals. It is entering a room full of people and seeing not only individual people, but violent systems and stark divisions. It is the violence of untreated mental illness exacerbated by the fact that reality, from some vantage points, really does resemble a psychotic nightmare. It is the violence of abuse and assault which is ignored or minimized by police officers, social services, and courts of law. Poverty is conflict. And for poor kids lucky enough to have the chance to “move up,” it is the conflict between remaining oppressed or collaborating with the oppressor."
-

And certainly, poverty is not a moral failing. 

Megan Lee (via queerintersectional)

(via socio-logic)

newyorker:

The International Center of Photography, in a joint effort with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, now offers digital access to its Roman Vishniac archive. Take a look at some of his work, which documents Eastern European Jewish life between 1935 and 1938.

Top: An elder of the village, Vysni Apsa, Carpathian Ruthenia, c. 1935–38. Bottom: Students sharing books in heder, Brod, c. 1935–38. Photographs © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.

(Source: newyorker.com)

"Their camouflage is military-issue, and not even patterned in a way that would provide any tactical advantage beyond intimidation. They’re driving vehicles designed to endure anti-tank mines. There is no possible anti-tank mine threat in Ferguson. Those weapons are in many instances newer and better than the ones used by active-duty Army units. To me, the Ferguson PD doesn’t look like the police. It doesn’t even look like the military. It looks like Blackwater, kitted up in expensive gear, ready to deal death with impunity. It looks like amateur hour, except the amateurs have live ammunition.

The Ferguson PD have decided to treat protesting citizens as an enemy formation, which they are not. I can’t help but think about my battalion commander in Afghanistan. We were an occupying military force in a foreign country with an active insurgency. There were regular bomb detonations in our province, many of which were revenge attacks against Afghans who collaborated with the Karzai government. The enemy didn’t wear a uniform. We didn’t speak their language. And yet, we had leaders who made it a point to engage with the civilian population as human beings, the kind of leaders that the Ferguson police department does not have. There is no language barrier in Ferguson, nor is there an insurgency or an occupation. This is neither Afghanistan nor Iraq. This is not a war zone. This is not Gezi Park or Tahrir Square. This is America, though you wouldn’t know it."
- Nathan Bradley Bethea: Echoes of Blackwater in Ferguson, Missouri - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics (via guernicamag)

(via guernicamag)